famous artWhile we’re inundated with art day-in and day-out, there are just a few particular pieces which have transcended time and tradition and have slated their place in art history. One of the largest artwork heists in historical past passed off on March 18, 1990, when two thieves disguised as police officers entered Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in the middle of the night, telling guards they had been investigating a disturbance.

While the imagery in this painting might not be essentially the most immediately recognizable, having sold for $78.1 million (adjusted value of $127.4 million), French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoires Bal du Moulin de la Galette is likely one of the most expensive work of all time and subsequently, one of the well-known.

And Rembrandt could not have been the only one to be gifted with a incapacity that gave him creative superpowers – an additional research confirmed that a disproportionate amount of famous artists and current artwork students suffer from stereoblindness as well.

People are likely to develop stereoblindness in early childhood, so if Rembrandt noticed the world in two dimensions, he possessed a pure skill – from a really young age – to translate what he noticed in entrance of him onto a two-dimensional canvas.